Thought for the day – on gamers

‘What’s we decided to do with this game was to go for the non- psychopathic part of the market. And that was a little hubristic because it really isn’t a non- psychopathic part of the market’

– Douglas Adams, recalling when he got involved with making a computer game

Thought for the day: for apt reasons

Cave furorem patientis.

Publilius Syrus

John Dryden translated this into the more familiar ‘Beware the fury of a patient man‘.

Yes, and the patient woman too – and I can testify, from personal experience, to the accuracy of this wisdom. But ol’ Publilius, who was writing back in the first century BC, probably wasn’t that worried about the distaff side.

I’d  never heard of the bloke, but he seems to have come up with some beaut words of wisdom,  pearls of insight we still, in our unknowing, unthinking, 21st-century way, still use frequently.

There’s a whole bunch of things he is said to have said, here. 

 

 

Thought for the day – for John Clarke’s birthday

“It’s a wee bit on the horrendous side, is this town-going.” – John Clarke/Fred Dagg

The late, and very much missed, John Clarke. For his birthday.

Contains Harris Street, just outside where the library is now, and bits of Victoria Street in that vicinity. Filmed in roughly 1976: it looked much the same when I moved to Wellers in 1982.

Thought of the day: from John Clarke/Fred Dagg

 

 

‘Of all the many turning points and crucial stages –  from primitive ape-like creature through to the sophisticated and marginally less primitive ape-like creature that you see about you at zoos and football matches – the most curious development of all is that of the human brain.

‘The human brain has got man into a lot more trouble than has previously been supposed and unless we come up with some way of putting the brain out of commission or obviating some of the more ludicrous effects of the brain, then I don’t think life’s going to get any better.’

Thought for the day – on political unintended consequences

‘It was, after all, Greeks who pioneered the writing of history as what it has so largely remained, an exercise in political ironics—an intelligible story of how men’s actions produce results other than those they intended.’ – J G A Pocock

Pocock was a New Zealander. Not born here, but brought up here and the first ever head of the Canterbury University political science department.

I don’t normally link to Wikipedia, but just this once: there’s more on him here.

I came across this line in a book on the Kennedys, but it seems apt right now. Sadly and worryingly apt.

Thought for the Day – from good ol’ Hunter S.

‘The main problem in any democracy is that crowd-pleasers are generally brainless swine who can go out on a stage & whup their supporters into an orgiastic frenzy—then go back to the office & sell every one of the poor bastards down the tube for a nickel apiece.’

– Hunter S Thompson.